A timber pavilion called Biobasecamp at Dutch Design Week brought together projects that demonstrate the potential of the “concrete of the future” to fight against climate change.

Studio Marco Vermeulen built the wooden pavilion as a covered exhibition-space for a series of displays highlighting how timber can be used in bio-based architecture projects.

Called Biobasecamp, the pavilion was erected in Ketelhuisplein in the Strijp-S district of Eindhoven for the duration of Dutch Design Week.

The roof of the pavilion was the shape of a five-pronged star with squared corners. It was built by timber construction specialists Derix from 200 metres-cubed of lightweight, modular 16 by 3.5 metre cross-laminated timber (CLT) boards.

“We want to introduce visitors to bio-based building and in particular the use of cross-laminated timber,” said the studio. “It generates a starting point of exploration for designers and clients towards the possibilities that this ‘concrete of the future’ offers.”

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Unlike concrete or other building materials which require large amounts of CO2 to produce, timber stores it. This allows the construction sector to “play an active role in the fight against climate change”, according to the studio.

“By building with wood, CO2 is actually extracted from the atmosphere,” said the studio. “In contrast to, for example, costly storage under the North Sea (CCS), this form of CO2 storage creates value in the form of buildings”.

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